Behind the Designer: Cheryl Luckett

Oct 14, 16

Getting to know interior design master Cheryl Luckett of Dwell by Cheryl Interiors.
View More: http://moniquefloyd.pass.us/dbc2015
Quick Hits:
Name: Cheryl Luckett
Design Firm: Dwell by Cheryl Interiors
Website: www.dwellbycheryl.com
Contact info: Cheryl@dwellbycheryl.com
Schooling/Credentials:
B.S. –Family and Consumer Sciences-Tennessee State University
Residential Design Degree-Central Piedmont Community College
photo-aug-05A Closer Look:
Cheryl Luckett got her start in the interior design space in 2011. Describing her aesthetic as inviting, energetic and classic (words we would use to describe the designer herself!), Cheryl approaches her designs with the belief that everyone deserves to dwell in a space they can’t wait to come home to. She has worked hard to bring interior design within reach, offering her distinctive look and beautiful designs to clients across a broad range of budgets and achieving them through savvy finds, vintage pieces and carefully curated finishing touches.

“I grew up in a family full of women who had immense pride in their homes,” Cheryl recalls. “I remember my grandmother moving furniture around nearly every weekend, and I looked forward to seeing what new floor plan she’d come up with next.” It’s easy to see her grandmother’s knack for creative spaces has made its way into Cheryl’s own DNA.
20131221_14_55_20aShe draws inspiration from fellow designers in the industry as well as from design books, magazines and social media. Particularly loving House Beautiful magazine, she admits to getting lost in its pages every month. She also counts local blogger Myquillyn Smith’s The Nesting Place among her favorite design books.
img_3286Cheryl’s own philosophy on interiors speaks to the personal touches she puts in her spaces. “As much as I love well-decorated interiors, I believe that a beautiful home is much more about the ability to create a welcoming and inviting space for those who live in and visit it, than what material possessions fill it.”

A thrifted abstract floral original watercolor painting is a piece of pride among Cheryl’s personal art collection. She describes it as “ a beautiful painting with variations of pink and green floral petals (my favorite colors) that flow effortlessly across the canvas. I was so happy the day I scored it for next to nothing. I could hardly get it home fast enough. It now has a prominent place in my living room.”
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Cheryl advises clients to find art pieces that resonate with their own personal sensibilities. She wants clients to choose work that they will love coming home to for years rather than something that feels on-trend. We love that Cheryl considers art to be the “heartbeat of the design,” elaborating that it “adds depth, interest and soul to a space.”img_3285Bedrooms are among her favorite space to design, and her most recent project is counted among her favorites to date: a bedroom for an aspiring 14-year old fashion illustrator. “It was like creating a space for my teenage self,” Cheryl says. “She had a clear vision for the colors and vibe of her bedroom and bathroom, and it was a pleasure bringing it to life for her (pictured above).”

When she isn’t bringing beauty to homes around Charlotte, Cheryl is dreaming of a vacation in Italy or traveling to Davidson to dine at her favorite spot, Kindred. Additionally she considers herself a “busy body,” and seems to always be hunting the next great deal, vintage piece or find. When she’s at home, she’s taking after her grandmother and mixing things up or playing in the garden. But undoubtedly, she’s leaving a bit of design magic in her trail.
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Harvest: Part III

Oct 7, 16

This week, we’re exploring “Harvest.” Below is part III, our final post. If you missed part I, catch up HERE. If you missed part II, catch up HERE.
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Below is a look at the final component of Harvest’s definition and what it means to our Gallery and artists.

4: an accumulated store or productive result.
This means we put our planting to work. We didn’t just plant one seed – but many. We put in the extra hours at the gym more than once. We created more than just one piece in the studio. We smiled and said hello and invested into someone else’s life every time we saw them. And now we are strong and healthy, now we have a collection of works that keep getting better and better, and now we have life-long friends or loyal customers. A farmer doesn’t plant one seed and plan to feed both his AND your family with it. He plants many. And through the trials, the seeds that survived become his plenty to fulfill your few. His result is productive. It is out of our overflow we can help others, but it started with planting our own seeds.screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-1-25-40-pm
Harvest is not just an act, but a mindset and state of being – of actively doing and pursuing the things we need and want in order to give what others need and want. To bring it all back around to art and the gallery, I believe artists live in the mindset and state of harvest. They pursue their passions to create something that will ultimately speak life into someone else. Anne paints angels. She uses her talents and passions in order to give hope and help the less fortunate. My abstract artists create deep, meaningful, cognitive pieces that help others find meaning in their own life. My impressionistic and realism artists share the beauty they see, so that you, the consumer, can forever behold that beauty.

My artists are sowers of seeds they may never see reaped, which can be difficult for an artist. They don’t always see the install or meet the person who proudly displays their work, but I hope that they know through Anne Neilson Fine Art, they have helped plant the seed of a harvest someone else will forever reap. Not just in the art, but in the way we’re able to financially give back through it. ANFA is committed to giving back 10% of all gallery sales to our exhibition partners – organizations and charities within the Charlotte community. We are blessed to give out of our overflow so that others have the opportunity to plant their own seeds, that perhaps were not available to plant before.

So while Harvest is still only seasonally appropriate to the majority of our society, I charge you to make Harvest the banner over your life. To dig deep, sow seeds, cultivate a mature crop, take hold of the blessings, and give out of your overflow. Harvest your relationships, harvest your work, harvest your passions, harvest yourself. Let’s continue to till the ground and bring forth a harvest of change – you can count on us to be doing that. Can we count on you to do it with us?

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Harvest: Part II

Oct 5, 16

This week, we’re exploring “Harvest.” Below is part II. If you missed part I, catch up HERE.
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Breaking down the definition of Harvest further:

2: the act or process of gathering in a crop.
This would imply a seed has been planted; that labor was involved and the undertakings of planting, pruning, and provision for that crop have been completed. Now that it’s produced, action/labor is again needed in order to gather the end result. Merriam and Webster, are you saying that harvest is not just the result but an action too? Major “ugh.” So often, I want the crop without the seed (see point #1), and even when I do plant the seed, and the crop has arrived, I don’t feel like I should have to get it – certainly not myself! Shouldn’t it just be given to me, already picked, cleaned, and ready to consume? Yet, I see the beauty in engaging in the gathering process. I see the self-esteem we all want, for ourselves and for others, being developed during the harvest. I see the independence and work ethic we desire for our children being cultivated during the gathering. How many harvests have I let slip by me because I wasn’t willing to gather? We must harvest the harvest in order to have gained anything.
welcome3: a mature crop.
This means the harvest cannot be considered a harvest until it is mature. Planting the seed is good. A sprout is the start of the harvest to be enjoyed and should be celebrated. But the sprout has not yet dug roots deep enough and produced fruit ripe enough for us to consume for our highest benefit. Sure, we could collect on the small investment, and say “see, my planting has produced,” but its fulfillment is shallow and quickly fades. I see my generation doing a lot of planting – getting a good education, creating technology, diving headfirst into their passions and exploring entrepreneurism. Those are all good things. Yet, just because we’ve planted the seed, doesn’t mean the harvest is immediate or without uncertainty. There are droughts, floods, and pests in life that threaten a crop’s ability to reach maturity, but each of those threats also help to produce resilience. The crop needs sun, the crop rain, and even need the animals. When we allow these trials to feed us instead of defeat us, we can produce a mature crop, a harvest. How often do we sabotage our own harvest by trying to collect or give up too soon?
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Harvest: Part I

Oct 5, 16

This week, we’ll be exploring “Harvest.” Below is part I, and we’ll see you Wednesday for part II.yellowandgreenpeppers

Harvest… the name of our current exhibition. It’s simple and fitting for the season. I think most people associate the word and its accompanying action with the Fall equinox – along with apple picking, all things cozy, and those three little letters in the order of P, S, and L. I like apple picking and being cozy (confession, I’m not a coffee drinker so I cannot comment on the PSL), but I typically like them just during the Fall. I appreciate them for that time of the year, then am able to move on to the other traditions and typical trends of the next season.

But, harvest, when I really think about it, is something I want to do year-round. I’m not talking about harvesting wheat or apples or spaghetti squash (although I do love a good spaghetti squash). I’m talking about harvesting the seeds we have planted in our life and seeing the investments we have made come to a fruitful, abundant Harvest.countryscene

Harvest, according to Merriam-Webster, means the following:

Full Definition of harvest

  • 1
:  the season for gathering in agricultural crops
  • 2
:  the act or process of gathering in a crop
  • 3
a :  a mature crop (as of grain or fruit) :  yield
b :  the quantity of a natural product gathered in a single season <deer harvest> <ice harvest>
    4
:  an accumulated store or productive result <a harvest of revenue>

Below is my breakdown of the definition of this mighty word.

1: the season for gathering in agricultural crops.
Nowhere does Merriam or Webster say “the fall equinox season for gathering.” Which means harvesting does happen and is meant to happen all year round with different crops. For whatever reason though, it just doesn’t sound very “Springy” or “Summery” and I think we like to just reserve the term for the Fall. So often I find myself and hearing others say, “Next exhibition we’ll do that,” “I’ll get to the gym once this or that,” “I’ll do it when the kids start school,” or “I’ll paint that when…,” and those things we want for our lives never happen because we are “reserving” them for another season. We want the harvest, but planting can be difficult, tedious, and doesn’t always fit into our ideal calendar. The more we postpone to “other seasons,” the less we can harvest in the one we’re in or about to step into. You can’t gather now what you didn’t plant before.

 

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Behind the Artist: Nancy Marshburn

Sep 26, 16

We’re excited to introduce you to one of Anne Neilson Fine Art’s newest artists, Nancy Marshburn. Get to know this dynamic new addition below!
0041-marshburn_nancy-1Quick Hits:
Name: Nancy Marshburn
Currently Living: North Carolina
See Her Work: http://anneneilsonfineart.com/artists/nancy-marshburn/

A Closer Look
Nancy Marshburn is an award-winning artist working in pastel and oil in a style described as contemporary realism. Her pastel paintings show the clarity, intensity and luminosity allowed with this medium. Her oils continue the exploration of still life and landscape in a refreshingly different media.Artichoke Heart-beat - 9x12 - Nancy Marshburn

Nancy’s signature work combines her intriguing loves of art and the medical field. Nancy earned a Bachelor of Arts in art and biology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, followed by a year in Wales on a Rotary International Scholarship studying medical photography. She attended the Medical College of Georgia, completing a Master of Science in Medical Art in 1984. After working as a freelance medical illustrator for over 20 years, she happily returned to her fine art roots.Transplant - 11x14 - Nancy Marshburn

The effects of light intrigue Nancy. Her paintings pull the viewer towards them with strong dark/light contrasts. A Sally Strand workshop reintroduced Nancy to the still life genre, a natural progression from her medical art. Nancy’s continuing interest in landscape painting is evolving towards more plein air work. The need to work quickly leads to fresh, decisive strokes and the southeast offers a plethora of scenes to paint. Outdoor painting provides balance to her more detailed still life work.

Inspired by the ordinary, Marshburn’s art focuses on a moment of beauty in a complex world.
A Stent in Time - 9x12 - Nancy Marshburn

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Calendar of Events Fall 2016

Sep 7, 16

Fall 2016 Calendar of Events

Our Summer exhibition, Peaceful Places, has concluded. Harvest our new exhibition is up and we are thrilled to be partnering with The Learning Collaborative.  Join us Thursday, September 15 from 6:30 – 8:30 pm for the opening reception. Receive 5% off your art purchase, the evening of September 15 when you bring in a donation of school supplies benefiting The Learning CollaborativeClick here to view the school supplies wish list.

More upcoming special events and exhibitions…

 

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Behind the Designer: Summer Tubridy

Aug 26, 16

Getting to know interior design master Summer Tubridy of Onyx Interiors.
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Quick Hits:
Name: Summer Tubridy
Design Firm: Onyx Interiors
Website: www.onyx-interiors.com
Contact info: summer@onyx-interiors.com
Schooling/Credentials: Art Institute of Charleston, BFA in Interior Design
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A Closer Look:
It’s hard to believe that Summer Tubridy has only been professionally designing spaces for six years. She admits, though, that the beginning stages of design started as a child, when at age 10, her father built their family home. Summer was influenced at that young age to design and build her own outdoor playhouse from remnants of stained wood planks, concrete block and pale rose carpeting.

In addition to that early experience and her father’s construction skills, Summer finds her passion from her grandmother’s love for interiors and gardening. The combined familial connections have allowed her to gain a deep understanding and broad sense of interior design from the beginning, opening the door for her to find a cohesive balance between aesthetics, form and function.
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When describing her design approach, Summer says, “First, Concept. Then, Design. Guided by each client’s aspirations, I provide a strong conceptual design to reach an intended goal – a personalized story that reflects the values, lifestyles and individual characteristics of the client for whom it is designed. It is important to me that the background palette has a classic elegant feel, and then layer with a dramatic, modern edge.” Fittingly, then, Summer self-describes her design aesthetic as classic, modern and dramatic.
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As she designs her spaces, she draws inspiration from her deep-rooted passion for science and art, drawing influence from natural materials. As she says, “I look for patterns, textures and colors that can be showcased into a fresh and modern design.” Summer’s favorite room to design in a home is a kitchen, believing it the perfect setting to allow you to play with different compositions, finishes and materials.

Summer also believes in the power of art within a space. “Art provides a story from the artist that captures the hearts and minds of the viewer,” she says. “Art needs to evoke emotion, draw you in, and make you think. If you have all these elements, then it’s a success.”
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Summer’s favorite project to date has been a local, Charlotte space: the penthouse suites at the VUE in Uptown. “I was fortunate enough to work with luxury apartment developer, Northwood Ravin, and select the interior finishes of the penthouses. This led to the opportunity to work with former NASCAR driver, Angela Cope and her husband Michael Ruch to design and furnish their 3,000sf high-rise penthouse.”

When she isn’t busy adding her knack for color and texture to spaces, Summer can be found on the lake with her husband Michael and their goldendoodle, Oscar, or diving into the duck breast and pan-fried corn at her favorite restaurant, Rooster’s Uptown.
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Behind the Artist: Audrey Stone

Aug 19, 16

We’re excited to introduce you to one of Anne Neilson Fine Art’s newest artists, Audrey Stone. Get to know this dynamic new addition below!
_DSC6788Quick Hits:
Name: Audrey Stone
Hometown: New York City, NY
Currently Living: Brooklyn, NY
See Her Work: http://anneneilsonfineart.com/artists/audrey-stone/

A Closer Look
Audrey Stone has known since the age of 9 that she wanted to be an artist. With an early influence from Michelangelo (and even fantasies that they were distant relatives!), Stone sold her first work while attending the Pratt Institute for her BFA, quickly followed by her first gallery show after graduation.
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With an aesthetic that she describes as subtle, simple and bold, she typically describes her pieces that are in-progress as her favorite. “I become very involved in my process, and it consumes me,” she explains. As she works she draws on inspiration from a bevy of artists, including Veja Celmins, Louise Bourgoise, Sheila Hicks, Lori Ellison and Anne Wilson, as well as personal inspiration from her grandmother.

“I keep a book of running ideas in which I sketch out the composition, color and medium to keep track of them. My ideas come in batches, and while I work on approximately 7 or 8 pieces at a time, sometimes there are too many ideas to work on at one time,” Audrey describes of her preparation process. “When I’m ready to start new work, I go back through the sketchbook, and if an idea still resonates, I move forward with it. Sometimes I create a color study on paper, a small painting of what a painting might ultimately become.”
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Audrey also appreciates time away from her work, including time with her two children. She recharges at a family home in Massachusetts, where she loves being on the deck and reading in the summer. Though she won’t often turn down a restorative beach vacation. She has also recently started taking nature photos. Most mornings you can find Audrey behind the camera shooting a few photos while on her morning walk.

She admits that the art world is not without its challenges. “As an artist it takes a long time to figure out how to live your life and make your work. I think it’s a slow process for many and there are highs and lows in terms of production and exhibitions. While I was getting my BFA we were often told: only 2% of you will be making art in 10 years, a terrible thing to say to young artists. I have been happily surprised by the amount of people I went to school with back then who have continued to make art. Many have had breaks in their art making for periods of time but they are doing it now.” Audrey approaches the challenges as simply and boldy as she approaches her work: one day a time.
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Audrey’s work takes slow, methodical timing. “I spend time and care on the craft involved,” she says. “I am inspired by the natural world and its emotional transitions.” It’s that inspiration that lends itself to her unique sense of color, process and selection of material.

Describing her artistic process, she says, “On the painting surfaces I paint one color on a piece a day so that it fully dries before the next layer. I often use tape to create the edge of color. If it is a combined sewn painting, I usually complete the painting part 1st, then move on to the sewing. While the paint dries on the painting sections I am working on, I sew on the sewing sections of other pieces.”

We are thrilled to be adding Audrey’s signature work to our range of Anne Neilson Fine Art’s roster of talents!

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Why Fine Art?

Aug 2, 16

It’s probably no surprise to you that I’m writing on this subject matter. After all, I’m a gallery director. My main job is to sell art. But it’s been said before, “what” we do is never nearly as important as “why” we do it. So let me explain my “why.”
Except a Wake of Music Accompany their Feet.48Why do I sell art?

Well, not to oversimplify it, but it’s fun. My office is the dreamiest space you’ve ever seen – with crisp white walls, high ceilings, exposed beams, natural lighting to die for, the echo of artists moving around their studios upstairs (not to mention their furry friends that come to work with them), and the most extraordinary art hung gracefully all around. I can’t imagine ever reverting to days I was stuck behind a cubicle where the painfully beige office walls had no art. I mean zero. Talk about uninspiring – both professionally and ultimately personally. The lifeless walls I had no choice but to look at arrested my dreams and kept me from believing in more for my life professionally. Which is WHY I believe art is important to the eyes. What we look at defines so much what we think about. What we think about, defines so much of what our heart believes. What our heart believes often determines the words we speak and the actions we live out. We must be mindful of what we give our attention to, and I believe art can be and is a catalyst for change, both personally and socially. So why do I sell art? Because I want to help inspire others, one beautiful piece at a time.

Why do I sell art for Anne Neilson?

This is a no brainer. Not only does ANFA have the best roster of artists in all of Charlotte, we are dedicated to a purpose much bigger than ourselves. More than being a successful gallery. More than having the best artists. More than having a pretty space. We believe in making a difference through art. Our mission is to give back into our community and share with you all the incredible charities and organizations that exist in Charlotte. Anne is dedicated to helping the homeless, inspiring hope to the less fortunate, and bringing joy to a child’s face. It is my honor and privilege to come along side of her in this mission and bring my best to maximize our impact. A portion of all gallery sales goes back into our community, and I couldn’t be more blessed by this commitment. I’ve read before that the same endorphins that are released when the human brain reacts to “winning,” are the SAME endorphins that are released when we GIVE. With each sale in the gallery, I get excited knowing we are able to help all the more. I can’t think of a better reason to come into work every day.
Kathy Cousart - Art above mantelWhy I believe fine art is a sound investment:

Perhaps similarly to my first question, I’ve experienced first-hand how great art can affect the soul. Clients come in looking for one thing, but fall in love with something else. Why? Because they connected with it on a much deeper level. Call it emotional, spiritual, whatever the case may be, but it is undeniable. I’ve passed the tissue box more times than I can remember. Over art! Art cannot audibly speak. Art cannot give affection. But somehow, it whispers into our soul and changes us.

Art can represent a hobby, a loved one, a place you love to visit, or simply make a room look good; but whichever purpose it serves, it leaves a legacy of who you are. It is an extension of you, your beliefs, feelings, thoughts, hopes, and dreams, and therefore art initiates and deepens relationships. It evokes conversation, questions, and opinions that might not otherwise have been shared. It establishes both spoken and unspoken connections between family members and strangers alike – giving way to the walls we build and assumptions that keep us from uniting. These raw, vulnerable relationships are what push humanity forward toward understanding and love.

Lastly, original artwork does differ from replicated pieces. Every original piece has a story that lives inside of it. The story of the artist – their belief and determination to create something beautiful, understood, and valued. Original art is the voice of an artist captured, only to live on as interpreted by its beholder. Each stroke, each layer, each technique – all uniquely applied by another human being living in that moment. A machine only does what it’s told. An artist does what it feels.

Art is so much bigger than the space I have to type about it here. It’s bigger than me; it’s bigger than you; and its impact is universal and transcendent of time and space. Now that you know my why, I’d love to invite you to pay a visit and find your own!

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Behind the Designer: Lisa Britt + Hadley Quisenberry

Jul 8, 16

We’re excited to kick off our new series spotlighting some of our favorite interior designers and taking you behind their style, inspiration and personality. Our inaugural feature highlights Lisa Britt and Hadley Quisenberry, the mother-daughter team behind design firm Lisa Britt Designs.
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Quick Hits:
Name: Lisa Britt & Hadley Quisenberry
Design Firm: Lisa Britt Designs
Website: www.lisabrittdesigns.com
Contact info: Hadley@lisabrittdesigns.com, 917-325-5359
Schooling/Credentials: IDS members
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A Closer Look:
Lisa has been designing beautiful spaces since 1980… 5 years before Hadley was even born. It’s unsurprising, then, that the world of interiors is in Hadley’s DNA.

When describing their design approach, Lisa and Hadley say, “We love to mix old and new to create chic yet comfortable spaces for our clients. We love to gain inspiration through travels abroad and believe that our innate passion for design is in our blood.”
Kaine Living Room (Mantle Centered Best)
Their spaces ooze with the three words they use to self-describe their aesthetic: transitional, warm and timeless. It’s hard to scroll through Instagram without wanting to climb through the screen and cozy up in their clients’ rooms, which typically feature neutrals and soothing shades of blue.

Lisa and Hadley agree that they love soaking up issues of Elle Décor and feel strongly about the role of investing in inspirational, original art within a space. They say, “Art is often our jumping off point for the room’s color palette. It is a key element because that is often what first catches your eye.” For Hadley, her own favorite art pieces include portraits of her two children, Britt and Georgia Grace, and the Anne Neilson angels that live in her nursery. When referring to client work, Hadley notes a recent living room she and her mom designed in Atlanta featuring a Marcy Gregg original.
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The Lisa Britt Design team also shared with us some personal favorites. They list dens and kitchens as favorite rooms to design because “they are the heartbeat of the home”; the beach as a favorite getaway; their recent trip to Greece as a family favorite; a love for implementing mid-century elements within a space; and local Charlotte dinner spot Kid Cashew as a must-visit while in the city.

Hadley and Lisa exude the same warmth that their spaces do, and it’s our pleasure to add art from within our walls to the walls of their client spaces.
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