Monthly Archives: October 2016

South End Gallery Crawl

Event date: Nov 4, 2016

SouthEndGalleryCrawl_2016Please join us Friday, November 4 from 6:00 – 8:30 pm for the South End Art Crawl.

Poised Taupe – Color of the Year

Oct 19, 16

Did you see? Sherwin-Williams released their 2017 Color of the Year a few weeks back and it’s bound to make all my fellow neutral-loving friends giddy! Below is a bit more about their selection, Poised Taupe, and curated works from our artists that would pair perfectly with the timeless trend.

Sherwin-Williams described the color as “modern, classic and a beautiful balance of warm and cool.” As trends continue to evolve and shift, it is apparent grey is taking a backseat in 2017 to the traditional tones of taupe and brown. Personally, I didn’t quite see this happening so quickly, but I am excited to see how this classic color will be given a modern and fresh feel to the world of design.

A favorite piece in the gallery that couldn’t be a more perfect match is “September in Paris” by gallery artist, Jeff Erickson. His modern and contemporary abstracts are strong, yet easy enough for any space. His mix of oil and wax give each painting a soft texture, soothing to the eyes. This particular piece was inspired by a trip to Europe with his wife. While two weeks were spent in Italy, their 9 hour layover in Paris’s charming streets was all he needed for inspiration. Croissant, anyone?

Jeff Erickson • September in Paris with Poised Taupe interior

Jeff Erickson • September in Paris with Poised Taupe interior

Jeff Erickson September in Paris

Jeff Erickson • September in Paris

This Holly Addi piece is modern and edgy, with a vintage flair. I originally imagined this piece perfectly hung in an airy loft or dynamic mid-century modern home. Yet, now against Poised Taupe, I see this piece bringing a freshness to any traditional style.

Holly Addi • Nordik Study 1 with Poised Taupe interior

Holly Addi • Nordik Study 1 with Poised Taupe interior

Holly Addi Nordik Study 1

Holly Addi • Nordik Study 1

If a traditional aesthetic is more your style, Deb Kaylor’s work will be the perfect winning combination for you! Her picturesque scenes are comforting and peaceful, warm and inviting – perhaps just what Poised Taupe is meant to accomplish. See below my picks of her work for your future Poised Taupe design.

Deb Kaylor Fawn

Deb Kaylor • Fawn (Sold)

Deb Kaylor • Strength

Deb Kaylor • Strength

Deb Kaylor • Welcome

Deb Kaylor • Welcome

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Behind the Designer: Cheryl Luckett

Oct 14, 16

Getting to know interior design master Cheryl Luckett of Dwell by Cheryl Interiors.
View More: http://moniquefloyd.pass.us/dbc2015
Quick Hits:
Name: Cheryl Luckett
Design Firm: Dwell by Cheryl Interiors
Website: www.dwellbycheryl.com
Contact info: Cheryl@dwellbycheryl.com
Schooling/Credentials:
B.S. –Family and Consumer Sciences-Tennessee State University
Residential Design Degree-Central Piedmont Community College
photo-aug-05A Closer Look:
Cheryl Luckett got her start in the interior design space in 2011. Describing her aesthetic as inviting, energetic and classic (words we would use to describe the designer herself!), Cheryl approaches her designs with the belief that everyone deserves to dwell in a space they can’t wait to come home to. She has worked hard to bring interior design within reach, offering her distinctive look and beautiful designs to clients across a broad range of budgets and achieving them through savvy finds, vintage pieces and carefully curated finishing touches.

“I grew up in a family full of women who had immense pride in their homes,” Cheryl recalls. “I remember my grandmother moving furniture around nearly every weekend, and I looked forward to seeing what new floor plan she’d come up with next.” It’s easy to see her grandmother’s knack for creative spaces has made its way into Cheryl’s own DNA.
20131221_14_55_20aShe draws inspiration from fellow designers in the industry as well as from design books, magazines and social media. Particularly loving House Beautiful magazine, she admits to getting lost in its pages every month. She also counts local blogger Myquillyn Smith’s The Nesting Place among her favorite design books.
img_3286Cheryl’s own philosophy on interiors speaks to the personal touches she puts in her spaces. “As much as I love well-decorated interiors, I believe that a beautiful home is much more about the ability to create a welcoming and inviting space for those who live in and visit it, than what material possessions fill it.”

A thrifted abstract floral original watercolor painting is a piece of pride among Cheryl’s personal art collection. She describes it as “ a beautiful painting with variations of pink and green floral petals (my favorite colors) that flow effortlessly across the canvas. I was so happy the day I scored it for next to nothing. I could hardly get it home fast enough. It now has a prominent place in my living room.”
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Cheryl advises clients to find art pieces that resonate with their own personal sensibilities. She wants clients to choose work that they will love coming home to for years rather than something that feels on-trend. We love that Cheryl considers art to be the “heartbeat of the design,” elaborating that it “adds depth, interest and soul to a space.”img_3285Bedrooms are among her favorite space to design, and her most recent project is counted among her favorites to date: a bedroom for an aspiring 14-year old fashion illustrator. “It was like creating a space for my teenage self,” Cheryl says. “She had a clear vision for the colors and vibe of her bedroom and bathroom, and it was a pleasure bringing it to life for her (pictured above).”

When she isn’t bringing beauty to homes around Charlotte, Cheryl is dreaming of a vacation in Italy or traveling to Davidson to dine at her favorite spot, Kindred. Additionally she considers herself a “busy body,” and seems to always be hunting the next great deal, vintage piece or find. When she’s at home, she’s taking after her grandmother and mixing things up or playing in the garden. But undoubtedly, she’s leaving a bit of design magic in her trail.
dbc10019-12

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Harvest: Part III

Oct 7, 16

This week, we’re exploring “Harvest.” Below is part III, our final post. If you missed part I, catch up HERE. If you missed part II, catch up HERE.
king-of-the-hillside-20x24

Below is a look at the final component of Harvest’s definition and what it means to our Gallery and artists.

4: an accumulated store or productive result.
This means we put our planting to work. We didn’t just plant one seed – but many. We put in the extra hours at the gym more than once. We created more than just one piece in the studio. We smiled and said hello and invested into someone else’s life every time we saw them. And now we are strong and healthy, now we have a collection of works that keep getting better and better, and now we have life-long friends or loyal customers. A farmer doesn’t plant one seed and plan to feed both his AND your family with it. He plants many. And through the trials, the seeds that survived become his plenty to fulfill your few. His result is productive. It is out of our overflow we can help others, but it started with planting our own seeds.screen-shot-2016-10-07-at-1-25-40-pm
Harvest is not just an act, but a mindset and state of being – of actively doing and pursuing the things we need and want in order to give what others need and want. To bring it all back around to art and the gallery, I believe artists live in the mindset and state of harvest. They pursue their passions to create something that will ultimately speak life into someone else. Anne paints angels. She uses her talents and passions in order to give hope and help the less fortunate. My abstract artists create deep, meaningful, cognitive pieces that help others find meaning in their own life. My impressionistic and realism artists share the beauty they see, so that you, the consumer, can forever behold that beauty.

My artists are sowers of seeds they may never see reaped, which can be difficult for an artist. They don’t always see the install or meet the person who proudly displays their work, but I hope that they know through Anne Neilson Fine Art, they have helped plant the seed of a harvest someone else will forever reap. Not just in the art, but in the way we’re able to financially give back through it. ANFA is committed to giving back 10% of all gallery sales to our exhibition partners – organizations and charities within the Charlotte community. We are blessed to give out of our overflow so that others have the opportunity to plant their own seeds, that perhaps were not available to plant before.

So while Harvest is still only seasonally appropriate to the majority of our society, I charge you to make Harvest the banner over your life. To dig deep, sow seeds, cultivate a mature crop, take hold of the blessings, and give out of your overflow. Harvest your relationships, harvest your work, harvest your passions, harvest yourself. Let’s continue to till the ground and bring forth a harvest of change – you can count on us to be doing that. Can we count on you to do it with us?

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Harvest: Part II

Oct 5, 16

This week, we’re exploring “Harvest.” Below is part II. If you missed part I, catch up HERE.
pickabale_14x18
Breaking down the definition of Harvest further:

2: the act or process of gathering in a crop.
This would imply a seed has been planted; that labor was involved and the undertakings of planting, pruning, and provision for that crop have been completed. Now that it’s produced, action/labor is again needed in order to gather the end result. Merriam and Webster, are you saying that harvest is not just the result but an action too? Major “ugh.” So often, I want the crop without the seed (see point #1), and even when I do plant the seed, and the crop has arrived, I don’t feel like I should have to get it – certainly not myself! Shouldn’t it just be given to me, already picked, cleaned, and ready to consume? Yet, I see the beauty in engaging in the gathering process. I see the self-esteem we all want, for ourselves and for others, being developed during the harvest. I see the independence and work ethic we desire for our children being cultivated during the gathering. How many harvests have I let slip by me because I wasn’t willing to gather? We must harvest the harvest in order to have gained anything.
welcome3: a mature crop.
This means the harvest cannot be considered a harvest until it is mature. Planting the seed is good. A sprout is the start of the harvest to be enjoyed and should be celebrated. But the sprout has not yet dug roots deep enough and produced fruit ripe enough for us to consume for our highest benefit. Sure, we could collect on the small investment, and say “see, my planting has produced,” but its fulfillment is shallow and quickly fades. I see my generation doing a lot of planting – getting a good education, creating technology, diving headfirst into their passions and exploring entrepreneurism. Those are all good things. Yet, just because we’ve planted the seed, doesn’t mean the harvest is immediate or without uncertainty. There are droughts, floods, and pests in life that threaten a crop’s ability to reach maturity, but each of those threats also help to produce resilience. The crop needs sun, the crop rain, and even need the animals. When we allow these trials to feed us instead of defeat us, we can produce a mature crop, a harvest. How often do we sabotage our own harvest by trying to collect or give up too soon?
sungold-tomatoes

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Harvest: Part I

Oct 5, 16

This week, we’ll be exploring “Harvest.” Below is part I, and we’ll see you Wednesday for part II.yellowandgreenpeppers

Harvest… the name of our current exhibition. It’s simple and fitting for the season. I think most people associate the word and its accompanying action with the Fall equinox – along with apple picking, all things cozy, and those three little letters in the order of P, S, and L. I like apple picking and being cozy (confession, I’m not a coffee drinker so I cannot comment on the PSL), but I typically like them just during the Fall. I appreciate them for that time of the year, then am able to move on to the other traditions and typical trends of the next season.

But, harvest, when I really think about it, is something I want to do year-round. I’m not talking about harvesting wheat or apples or spaghetti squash (although I do love a good spaghetti squash). I’m talking about harvesting the seeds we have planted in our life and seeing the investments we have made come to a fruitful, abundant Harvest.countryscene

Harvest, according to Merriam-Webster, means the following:

Full Definition of harvest

  • 1
:  the season for gathering in agricultural crops
  • 2
:  the act or process of gathering in a crop
  • 3
a :  a mature crop (as of grain or fruit) :  yield
b :  the quantity of a natural product gathered in a single season <deer harvest> <ice harvest>
    4
:  an accumulated store or productive result <a harvest of revenue>

Below is my breakdown of the definition of this mighty word.

1: the season for gathering in agricultural crops.
Nowhere does Merriam or Webster say “the fall equinox season for gathering.” Which means harvesting does happen and is meant to happen all year round with different crops. For whatever reason though, it just doesn’t sound very “Springy” or “Summery” and I think we like to just reserve the term for the Fall. So often I find myself and hearing others say, “Next exhibition we’ll do that,” “I’ll get to the gym once this or that,” “I’ll do it when the kids start school,” or “I’ll paint that when…,” and those things we want for our lives never happen because we are “reserving” them for another season. We want the harvest, but planting can be difficult, tedious, and doesn’t always fit into our ideal calendar. The more we postpone to “other seasons,” the less we can harvest in the one we’re in or about to step into. You can’t gather now what you didn’t plant before.

 

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