Monthly Archives: August 2016

Behind the Designer: Summer Tubridy

Aug 26, 16

Getting to know interior design master Summer Tubridy of Onyx Interiors.
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Quick Hits:
Name: Summer Tubridy
Design Firm: Onyx Interiors
Website: www.onyx-interiors.com
Contact info: summer@onyx-interiors.com
Schooling/Credentials: Art Institute of Charleston, BFA in Interior Design
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A Closer Look:
It’s hard to believe that Summer Tubridy has only been professionally designing spaces for six years. She admits, though, that the beginning stages of design started as a child, when at age 10, her father built their family home. Summer was influenced at that young age to design and build her own outdoor playhouse from remnants of stained wood planks, concrete block and pale rose carpeting.

In addition to that early experience and her father’s construction skills, Summer finds her passion from her grandmother’s love for interiors and gardening. The combined familial connections have allowed her to gain a deep understanding and broad sense of interior design from the beginning, opening the door for her to find a cohesive balance between aesthetics, form and function.
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When describing her design approach, Summer says, “First, Concept. Then, Design. Guided by each client’s aspirations, I provide a strong conceptual design to reach an intended goal – a personalized story that reflects the values, lifestyles and individual characteristics of the client for whom it is designed. It is important to me that the background palette has a classic elegant feel, and then layer with a dramatic, modern edge.” Fittingly, then, Summer self-describes her design aesthetic as classic, modern and dramatic.
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As she designs her spaces, she draws inspiration from her deep-rooted passion for science and art, drawing influence from natural materials. As she says, “I look for patterns, textures and colors that can be showcased into a fresh and modern design.” Summer’s favorite room to design in a home is a kitchen, believing it the perfect setting to allow you to play with different compositions, finishes and materials.

Summer also believes in the power of art within a space. “Art provides a story from the artist that captures the hearts and minds of the viewer,” she says. “Art needs to evoke emotion, draw you in, and make you think. If you have all these elements, then it’s a success.”
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Summer’s favorite project to date has been a local, Charlotte space: the penthouse suites at the VUE in Uptown. “I was fortunate enough to work with luxury apartment developer, Northwood Ravin, and select the interior finishes of the penthouses. This led to the opportunity to work with former NASCAR driver, Angela Cope and her husband Michael Ruch to design and furnish their 3,000sf high-rise penthouse.”

When she isn’t busy adding her knack for color and texture to spaces, Summer can be found on the lake with her husband Michael and their goldendoodle, Oscar, or diving into the duck breast and pan-fried corn at her favorite restaurant, Rooster’s Uptown.
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Harvest Exhibition

Event date: Sep 15, 2016

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Join us Thursday, September 15 from 6:30 – 8:30 pm for the opening reception of our Harvest Exhibition. RSVP preferred to info@anneneilsonfineart.com.

Receive 5% off your art purchase, the evening of September 15 when you bring in a donation of school supplies benefiting The Learning Collaborative. Click here to view the school supplies wish list.

Behind the Artist: Audrey Stone

Aug 19, 16

We’re excited to introduce you to one of Anne Neilson Fine Art’s newest artists, Audrey Stone. Get to know this dynamic new addition below!
_DSC6788Quick Hits:
Name: Audrey Stone
Hometown: New York City, NY
Currently Living: Brooklyn, NY
See Her Work: http://anneneilsonfineart.com/artists/audrey-stone/

A Closer Look
Audrey Stone has known since the age of 9 that she wanted to be an artist. With an early influence from Michelangelo (and even fantasies that they were distant relatives!), Stone sold her first work while attending the Pratt Institute for her BFA, quickly followed by her first gallery show after graduation.
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With an aesthetic that she describes as subtle, simple and bold, she typically describes her pieces that are in-progress as her favorite. “I become very involved in my process, and it consumes me,” she explains. As she works she draws on inspiration from a bevy of artists, including Veja Celmins, Louise Bourgoise, Sheila Hicks, Lori Ellison and Anne Wilson, as well as personal inspiration from her grandmother.

“I keep a book of running ideas in which I sketch out the composition, color and medium to keep track of them. My ideas come in batches, and while I work on approximately 7 or 8 pieces at a time, sometimes there are too many ideas to work on at one time,” Audrey describes of her preparation process. “When I’m ready to start new work, I go back through the sketchbook, and if an idea still resonates, I move forward with it. Sometimes I create a color study on paper, a small painting of what a painting might ultimately become.”
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Audrey also appreciates time away from her work, including time with her two children. She recharges at a family home in Massachusetts, where she loves being on the deck and reading in the summer. Though she won’t often turn down a restorative beach vacation. She has also recently started taking nature photos. Most mornings you can find Audrey behind the camera shooting a few photos while on her morning walk.

She admits that the art world is not without its challenges. “As an artist it takes a long time to figure out how to live your life and make your work. I think it’s a slow process for many and there are highs and lows in terms of production and exhibitions. While I was getting my BFA we were often told: only 2% of you will be making art in 10 years, a terrible thing to say to young artists. I have been happily surprised by the amount of people I went to school with back then who have continued to make art. Many have had breaks in their art making for periods of time but they are doing it now.” Audrey approaches the challenges as simply and boldy as she approaches her work: one day a time.
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Audrey’s work takes slow, methodical timing. “I spend time and care on the craft involved,” she says. “I am inspired by the natural world and its emotional transitions.” It’s that inspiration that lends itself to her unique sense of color, process and selection of material.

Describing her artistic process, she says, “On the painting surfaces I paint one color on a piece a day so that it fully dries before the next layer. I often use tape to create the edge of color. If it is a combined sewn painting, I usually complete the painting part 1st, then move on to the sewing. While the paint dries on the painting sections I am working on, I sew on the sewing sections of other pieces.”

We are thrilled to be adding Audrey’s signature work to our range of Anne Neilson Fine Art’s roster of talents!

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Why Fine Art?

Aug 2, 16

It’s probably no surprise to you that I’m writing on this subject matter. After all, I’m a gallery director. My main job is to sell art. But it’s been said before, “what” we do is never nearly as important as “why” we do it. So let me explain my “why.”
Except a Wake of Music Accompany their Feet.48Why do I sell art?

Well, not to oversimplify it, but it’s fun. My office is the dreamiest space you’ve ever seen – with crisp white walls, high ceilings, exposed beams, natural lighting to die for, the echo of artists moving around their studios upstairs (not to mention their furry friends that come to work with them), and the most extraordinary art hung gracefully all around. I can’t imagine ever reverting to days I was stuck behind a cubicle where the painfully beige office walls had no art. I mean zero. Talk about uninspiring – both professionally and ultimately personally. The lifeless walls I had no choice but to look at arrested my dreams and kept me from believing in more for my life professionally. Which is WHY I believe art is important to the eyes. What we look at defines so much what we think about. What we think about, defines so much of what our heart believes. What our heart believes often determines the words we speak and the actions we live out. We must be mindful of what we give our attention to, and I believe art can be and is a catalyst for change, both personally and socially. So why do I sell art? Because I want to help inspire others, one beautiful piece at a time.

Why do I sell art for Anne Neilson?

This is a no brainer. Not only does ANFA have the best roster of artists in all of Charlotte, we are dedicated to a purpose much bigger than ourselves. More than being a successful gallery. More than having the best artists. More than having a pretty space. We believe in making a difference through art. Our mission is to give back into our community and share with you all the incredible charities and organizations that exist in Charlotte. Anne is dedicated to helping the homeless, inspiring hope to the less fortunate, and bringing joy to a child’s face. It is my honor and privilege to come along side of her in this mission and bring my best to maximize our impact. A portion of all gallery sales goes back into our community, and I couldn’t be more blessed by this commitment. I’ve read before that the same endorphins that are released when the human brain reacts to “winning,” are the SAME endorphins that are released when we GIVE. With each sale in the gallery, I get excited knowing we are able to help all the more. I can’t think of a better reason to come into work every day.
Kathy Cousart - Art above mantelWhy I believe fine art is a sound investment:

Perhaps similarly to my first question, I’ve experienced first-hand how great art can affect the soul. Clients come in looking for one thing, but fall in love with something else. Why? Because they connected with it on a much deeper level. Call it emotional, spiritual, whatever the case may be, but it is undeniable. I’ve passed the tissue box more times than I can remember. Over art! Art cannot audibly speak. Art cannot give affection. But somehow, it whispers into our soul and changes us.

Art can represent a hobby, a loved one, a place you love to visit, or simply make a room look good; but whichever purpose it serves, it leaves a legacy of who you are. It is an extension of you, your beliefs, feelings, thoughts, hopes, and dreams, and therefore art initiates and deepens relationships. It evokes conversation, questions, and opinions that might not otherwise have been shared. It establishes both spoken and unspoken connections between family members and strangers alike – giving way to the walls we build and assumptions that keep us from uniting. These raw, vulnerable relationships are what push humanity forward toward understanding and love.

Lastly, original artwork does differ from replicated pieces. Every original piece has a story that lives inside of it. The story of the artist – their belief and determination to create something beautiful, understood, and valued. Original art is the voice of an artist captured, only to live on as interpreted by its beholder. Each stroke, each layer, each technique – all uniquely applied by another human being living in that moment. A machine only does what it’s told. An artist does what it feels.

Art is so much bigger than the space I have to type about it here. It’s bigger than me; it’s bigger than you; and its impact is universal and transcendent of time and space. Now that you know my why, I’d love to invite you to pay a visit and find your own!

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